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20130115
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and congresswoman rob andrews. we have congressman johnson on your this well and the prevention tax force or violence. also mike thompson, thank you for your leadership. we are also joined by steny hoyer. with that, we will go to our cochairs. >> i think you very much, madam leader. chairman injuries, to everyone for scheduling this critical and very timely hearing. as the president indicated, there has been assigning of executive orders by the president and we all feel the urgency of responding to the dangers that are communities confront. with the distribution of guns and large capacity magazines and with the status of our mental health observations who ought not to have guns and make sure that we know who is getting weapons and bringing danger to our community. i appreciate the witnesses and i welcome them and it is obviously an extraordinarily timely hearing. the witnesses and the attendance in the media of the public. thank you for being here. thank you, madam leader. >> thank you very much, madam leader. it is a privilege for me to welcome all of you, and i want to say thank you to
released a letter to vice president scott smith, our second vice president kevin johnson and i drafted, 131 of our mayors sign, calling on congress to adopt a bipartisan and balanced approach deficit reduction by incorporating spending cuts with additional revenue. we took the same message to both political conventions and to the presidential debate where mayors of both parties were active and visible participants, speaking for commonsense solutions to the pending fiscal crisis. in just one week after the election, our leadership came to washington. we met with the vice president biden in the white house, the entire house democratic leadership, senate majority caucus, and rising leaders such as senator marco rubio, and other key decision-makers, pushing for action to the fiscal cliff. during those meetings we made it known that cities have already led on deficit reduction. mayors know how to balance budgets. [applause] we do it every day. we do it every year. through this recession we made the tough decisions that washington has been unwilling to make. while we also maintained key investmen
. then-president john f. kennedy in 1961. george h. w. bush in 1989. lyndon johnson from 1965. president jimmy carter in 1977. he will wrap up the night at 11 p.m. eastern president george w. bush, 2001. starting tonight at 8 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> why did you write a book about your experience because it was an abortive period of history. i felt that the fdic's perspective should be brought to bear. have been some other accounts of the crisis i thought were not completely accurate. especially since what we did and what i did. so i thought it was important for historical record to present our perspective and also i think currently for people to understand that there were different policy choices, different policy options, disagreements. and that if we want to present this crisis, another crisis from happening again i've only felt that the public itself needed to be engaged more on financial reform, to educate themselves better, make an issue with their elected officials. i have some policy recommendations at the end of the. i hope people will look at this recent. >> the former head o
in this senate? the contrast is enormous from the time that lyndon b. johnson was president of the senate. lyndon b. johnson for six years presiding over this body saw one filibuster. and harry reid in his six years presiding over this senate has seen 391 filibusters. and let me convey that even when you have the votes to end a filibuster, the fact that it is launched creates enormous paralysis. imagine you're debating a bill and you continue debating through the end of the week and you come in the following monday and you debate and nobody has anything to say and so somebody says, "i ask unanimous consent that we have a final vote on this bill." now, you see, we don't have a previous question, motion on this floor, so one has to ask for unanimous consent. any of a hundred senators can weigh in and say "no." and when they they weigh in and say "no" on that monday, on tuesday, a petition is put forward with 16 senators saying, let's have a vote on closing debate. and that vote can't happen until thursday, under the rules. and if it's successful on a thursday, you have to have 30 hours more of deba
. trillions of dollars have been spent since president johnson declared war on poverty, and yet the gerald the poverty rate nationwide has remained virtually unchanged at more than 23%. we need a new strategy. we intuitively know that the brookings institute is reported. the best way to combat childhood poverty is three things. the key to the child success is the ability to read. this morning 45,000 kansas children woke up, one dressed and went to kindergarten. a class of two dozen 25 and their the future of kansas. being a will to read is one of the greatest gift that we can give these children, yet 29 percent of kansas' fourth graders didn't work -- can we get a basic level. the goal of the of restoration is to ensure each of the 40,000 kindergartners is able to read professionally by the time they reach the fourth grade. we can do this. we must do this. it is important to our kids. [applause] this is why i am proposing that chances as the initiative with three components, first providing $12 million support to innovative programs to help struggling readers. second, provide incentives to
submitted and i've written about this a great deal. was a lemon has written about a it, simon johnson the great scholar has written about it and others, that what is happening to your is one of the reasons we have not clicked as quickly as possible in recovering from the crisis is because the transition mechanism for monetary policy is found up. think of it as sludge in the motor of your engine. it's hard to get the pistons to move. we provide the fuel, the central bank. it has to be into the economy. we not only have to inducer and sent people to step on the accelerator to create more jobs. that's a matter of having to rip us from our vacations, tax incentives and so on, that has to be transmitted to the banking system. these banks are in such deep trouble in control so much of the assets have been focused on other things. they are interfering the effectiveness for accommodative monetary policy. if you get people to understand this is hurting job creation in the district come he might more political support. i believe this support is gaining ground. it's not just a question of fairne
've written about this great deal, how dan has written about it, rosa has written about, simon johnson the great scholar, and others. that what is happening is the reason, one of the reasons we have not clicked as quickly as possible in recovering from the crisis is because the transmission mechanism for monetary policy is dumped out. think of it as sludge on the motor of age. it's very hard to get the pistons to move. we provide the fuel, central bank. it has to be transmitted into the economy. and when i don't have to and sent people to step on the accelerator, to create more jobs, that's a matter of having to write laws, right regulation, right tax incentives and so on. but it has to be transmitted through the banking system. and these banks that were in such deep trouble and controlled so much of the industry's assets have been focused on other things. so they are interfering with the effectiveness as i mentioned in my speech. if you can get people to understand that this is holding back and hurting job creation in our district, then i think you might have a little bit more politic
lyndon johnson's legislative genius to process forward, beat back resistance and over, what seem to be an unshakable logjam. in short, in our lifetime we observed enough nontrivial policy change to recognize that the iron grip of static coal forces can be shattered and policy can progress. in the next few weeks we can anticipate and hope that the debate over the effect of regulation of guns and the appropriate balance between individual rights and civic obligations will command sustained and serious attention from our political leadership. advocates will mobilize as lobbyists apply to cases, and politicians will fight over the issues. we know that. and in this unruly mix, universities like ours can and will discharge a critical role providing principle holdings for this debate. here at johns hopkins, our scholars have been investigating the public health affects of gun violence for well over two decades. for the past 17 years, the center for gun policy and research, as visited by our colleague him has provided a home for the study, producing nationally recognized research and rec
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8